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Local Cartoonist Draws Non-stop For 24 Hours To Raise Over S$8,000 For HFH Singapore

More Than 950 Caricatures Drawn; Donations Will Help Support Batam Build

SINGAPORE, 11th January 2008: Singaporean cartoonist Peter Zhuo is no stranger to feats. In November 2007, he earned an entry in the Guinness Book of Records for having drawn the world’s largest caricature – a 360 sq. m. drawing of Hollywood and Hong Kong action star Jackie Chan on a huge canvas on the floor of a Singapore shopping mall.

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(Top) Singapore cartoonist Peter Zhuo (in red) with Daniel whom he had drawn.
(Bottom) Two hours into the 24-hour drawing marathon at a McDonald’s outlet in Singapore.

His latest feat was in aid of Habitat for Humanity Singapore when he went on a 24-hour drawing marathon at a local McDonald’s outlet. From 7pm on Saturday to 7pm on Sunday, he completed 952 caricatures of children and adults and raised $8,500 (US$5,930) from voluntary donations. The single largest donation was S$1,500. The money will be used to support Habitat’s Batam Build program on the Indonesian island that is about an hour’s ferry ride away from Singapore.

The 23-year-old Zhuo, who goes by the name of Peter Draw, said in an interview with a Singapore Chinese newspaper: “After 12 hours, my fingers started to feel numb; even my arm ached when I was holding the marker pen. But I schooled myself to draw even faster. I was worried that once the pain set in, I would not be able to continue.

“To forget about the pain, I focused on those families who need my help…Strangely, I didn’t feel at all tired after the event was over.”

Hosea Lai, HFH Singapore’s director of programs, said the self-taught cartoonist was “a good match” for the event as it was a novel idea. In turn, Zhuo’s decision to partner with HFH Singapore was based on what he noticed in his several encounters with children. Many of the children, whom he has taught to draw, are fond of houses as a subject. “A home is the children’s symbol of happiness and security.”