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Habitat Tajikistan and Habitat Guatemala: A healthy partnership

August 13, 2009

   
 

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In December of 2008, Habitat for Humanity Tajikistan received a tithe contribution of US$20,000 from Habitat Guatemala. By June of this year, 150 Tajik families had been provided with new water filters, three community reservoirs were built and 440 individuals had been trained on water-related health and hygiene.

TAJIKISTAN— According to a survey by the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Office (ECHO), only 58 percent of Tajikistan’s population of 7,000 has access to safe drinking water. It is also shown that every year roughly 51 percent of the Tajik population contracts water-borne illnesses, such as typhoid, hepatitis, diarrhea and dysentery.

These issues describe a reality also faced by thousands of Latin Americans. In addition to the efforts of Habitat Guatemala to reach across the world to lend a hand, programs such as Habitat Colombia and Habitat Honduras are also finding innovative and collaborative ways to address health as it relates to housing.

In December of 2008, Habitat for Humanity Tajikistan received a tithe contribution of US$20,000 from Habitat Guatemala. By June of this year, 150 Tajik families had been provided with new water filters, three community reservoirs were built and 440 individuals had been trained on water-related health and hygiene as a result of Habitat Guatemala’s donation. Today, Habitat Tajikistan shares a heart-felt “thank you.”

Meet Saidahmad Obidov
Saidahmad, 60, was born and raised in Kumsangir village. He and his wife Shahriniso, and their five children–three daughters and two sons—live in a remote village of the Kumsangir district. Saidahmad is an art teacher and his wife is a custodian in the local high school.

The family was chosen as a beneficiary for Habitat for Humanity Tajikistan’s Bio Sand Water Filter project. “Our water was dirty, and of bad quality. Our community in Kumsangir doesn’t have good infrastructure and water supply system since the times when Soviet Union collapsed,” says Saidahmad. “The water we used was from contaminated irrigation fields. But then a ‘magic’ happened in our life one day, when Habitat Tajikistan representatives met with our community and presented the BSWF project. They examined our situation and my family and I became beneficiaries” he says. Hey later adds, “The water that the filter produces is very fresh and clean. Thank you Habitat for Humanity Tajikistan for providing us with safe drinking water.”

Habitat affiliates, individuals, churches, youth groups and more can all choose to support any national Habitat program through their yearly tithe. If you would like more information about tithing to programs in Latin America and the Caribbean, please contact Eugenia Salazar.

Photos and story courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Europe/Central Asia.